Tag Archives: brook trout

Fight Like Meat

There is no known reason for a trout to be in this pond. It is a warm water pond of municipal park vintage with no appreciable depth, a small battery of largemouth and one billion bluegill.

The bluegill hit flies when the sun is out and are at the ready when a lunchtime bend is needed. The bass have seen too many lures to let their guard down often, but when they do the results ripple through the entire containment.

In October a truck shows up full of trout and people line the banks and fill buckets. They are typically cleaned out within days, their long term prospects on par with the tank lobsters at the diner.

Honestly, from my vantage point I thought it was a bass. I had on a bluegill popper but cast it over and watched the fish turn and slash.

I waited for the jump but the fish rolled on its side like an omega dog and let me pull it to the bank.

Somehow it survived the winter I guess but I still don’t like its prospects.

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The Drinking Man’s Guide To Drinking

Courtesy ©Peter Strid Art (http://stridart.blogspot.com/)

He was a Brit living in Singapore and he smoked cigarettes that smelled like incense. He kept buying us expensive vodka as a reward for our work and, at some point, suggested it would be a good idea to snort it.

He turned out to be a fisherman and he told stories about chasing trout in Pakistan and we chose to believe him. He headed an agency branch and traveled Asia to work on ad campaigns and he appreciated our mindless intern support over here.

He wanted us to try absinthe but of course we couldn’t get it so he ordered some 100 proof. Abby started to slump in her chair and I found myself unable to stop talking about this one Adirondack brook trout.

We later found out he won multiple One Show pencils for his work but when he left all we remembered was he wanted us to meet at the docks for his morning charter.

By that point we realized we’d been done in by a professional. And there’s only so much you can do when you can’t even hold it together.

More on the Connetquot Matter

Brookie Underwater

Of interest mainly to people in the NYC Metro:

My buddy Stefan wanted to find out more about the Connetquot and forwarded me this email response he got.

On Behalf of Ronald F. Foley, Regional Director, LI Region March 25, 2009
Dear Mr.REDACTED :
On Behalf of Commissioner Carol Ash, I am writing in response to your e-mail of   March 19, 2009 concerning the Connetquot River State Park Preserve Hatchery.
Trout in the Connetquot River and hatchery have tested positive for Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN).  We are working closely with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to address the matter.
No trout will be hatched or raised in the hatchery this coming season in order to give us time to both develop a long-term strategy, and to implement immediate tactics to decrease the virus throughout the hatchery and the river.  However we ultimately resolve the IPN issue, the park preserve will remain open to fishing, riding, hiking, birding, nature walks and all the programs and activities the public has come to enjoy.
IPN is not a simple condition and there is no simple answer that comprehensively addresses the complex impacts IPN presents to the natural ecosystem of the watershed, to everyone’s satisfaction.  We will do our very best to achieve the state’s objective to eradicate IPN in the Connetquot River and our hatchery, and to continue to provide world-class fishing, as well as the opportunity to visit and witness the operation of our 19th century hatchery.
Connetquot River State Park Preserve, its buildings, grounds, the river and the hatchery are “a jewel for all to enjoy”.  Our goal is to ensure that the park and the experience will continue for generations to come.
Sincerely,
Ronald F. Foley
Regional Director
Long Island Region

Bad Hatchery Craziness

This Ken Shultz article came out just before the NY State DEC discovered IPN.

The Connetquot represents in one localized microcosm the best and the worst of a hatchery sustained fishery. On the one hand, a stream this close to such high population density could never support pure wild fish with unrestricted access to them. Operating a stream on a pay-to-reserve English beat system with a carefully managed stocking program allows for solitude rather than shoulder to shoulder and the chance to fish larger than normal brown, brook, and rainbow trout.

On the other hand, it is not reality.

On the one hand, the big sea runs and the cagey eight-pound holdovers with the hooked jaws exist in numbers not seen in normalcy.

On the other hand, the fish just out of the hatchery will hit a cigarette butt.

On the one hand, the state park encasing the stream is well protected and maintained and offers sanctuary for deer, wild turkey, fox, osprey, even bald eagle. The fishing is restricted to fly only, with barbless hooks. Rules violations result in banishment.

On the other hand, the catching can be so prolific it becomes a numbers game.

And then you have the bizarre scene now where in order to save the river, the trout must be killed. The hatchery had to close its doors and dump 80,000 fish into the river. Since January 1st there’s been a 10-fish a day bag limit. It’s been pretty fished out.

Some really big browns–feral holdovers that shed their hatchery dumbness years ago–are still left. Some guy pulled a 30-incher out last week. Of the few fish we saw caught, we estimated one to be 7 pounds and the another probably four.  They were not released.

It’s bittersweet.

Skunk Hour*

What happens when a Montauk Surf Vampire and saltwater guy with a slight Florida ditch obsession conspire to fish a trout stream? Nothing.

More later on the state of said trout stream, stocked, and the ongoing efforts to de-stock it in hopes of restocking it later. In a word, bizarre.

[UPDATE: Jason did in fact hook and land a rainbow, but I had blocked it out of my memory.]

*(With apologies to Robert Lowell)

LONG ISLAND: B-List Hatchery Blowout

The Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery, the place responsible for introducing brown trout to the U.S., celebrated its 125th Anniversary this weekend.

To celebrate, they threw a party and invited Joyce Dewitt, Erik Estrada, and Adam West. I’d give up 30 days of fly fishing to talk brook trout with Ponch.